People Photogrpahy

Be My Guest Monday 12/6/10: Lee Varis

It's "Be My Guest Monday," the day of the week that's turned over to a talented guest blogger for a cool tip, trick or technique.

Today's guest: Lee Varis

Take it away, Lee!

Channel Blending for Tone Control

I'd like to share an advanced concept for tone control in Photoshop. This channel blending idea forms the basis of my 10-Channel Workflow for digital photography. Lets start with this colorful image of a sunflower (you might want to right-click and save this image so you can follow along):

sunflower

It is important to realize that all digital photographs are captured as three B&W images representing the Red, Green and Blue channels. If we examine the individual channels of this image we can see three radically different B&W renderings:

Red Channel

Red

Green Channel

Green

Blue Channel

Blue

We can take advantage of this when we create a B&W version of the color image. Go to the "Channels" panel in Photoshop and select "Split Channels" from the Channel options flyaway menu at the upper right corner of the pannel:

Split Channels

This will split the document into three separate grayscale documents representing the Red, Green and Blue channels. We can then drag one document on top of the other to creat a layer stack that we can use to blend between each "channel" layer to create a new composite rendering.

Select the "Move" tool, click in the middle of the "Green" document and drag onto the "Red" document while holding down the "Shift" Key. If you are using a "Tabbed" view in CS5, you'll have to drag onto the "Tab" for the Red document and wait for that document to come forward before letting go. Holding down the "Shift" key insures that the new layer will center over the underlying image. This alligns the layers in registration since the documents are the same size! The Green document will now be a new layer on top of the Red Background layer:

Layers-Green on Red

One easy way to "blend" the two layers (Red and Green) is to simply use the "Opacity" slider as shown above. More complicated blends can be achieved by using the layer blend modes accessed from the drop down menu under the "Layers" panel title at the upper left. By selecting "Darken" from this menu...

Darken Blend Mode

... we blend only the darker elements of the Green layer into the Red background. The only thing darker in the green layer are the petals of the flower – this way we can preserver the darker sky from the red channel:

Green Plus Red in Darken Mode

By now we should be thinking about what contribution the Blue channel document can make. Drag the Blue document ontop of the Red-Green document (using the "Move Tool" as described before)– this places the Blue document as a layer on top of both the Green and Red layers. Now... thinking outside the box, lets invert that Blue layer so everything that is dark is now light: select Image–> Adjustments–> Invert:

Invert

Inverted

Now we can multiply this over the underlying layers – change the Layers blending mode to Multiply:

Multiply Layer

The result will be an exagerated darkening of the sky that creates an infrared effect:

Infrared Effect

We can also take advantage of layer masks to further refine the blend and create a sophisticated gradient filter effect. Create a new layer mask by clicking on the layer mask icon at the bottom of the Layers panel. Then drag out a black to white gradient so that the bottom of the mask is black and the top white:

Gradient Mask

The resulting B&W rendering is something that would be impossible to create using simple contrast controls or normal B&W adjustment tools.

B&W gradient sky

Now... thinking way, way outside the box – what would happen if we could apply the lights and darks of this new B&W rendering back onto the original color image?

Flatten the image and "Save As" – re-open the original RGB version. Now drag the B&W version onto the original RGB color version using the "Move Tool" as we described before.

Something very interesting happens when we change the layer blend mode to luminosity:

Luminosity Blend

The result applies the lights and darks of the B&W layer to the color from the underlying layer and we get a dramatic new color rendering!

New Color

This new color has the dramatic gradient in the sky and enhanced contrast from the B&W version but all of the intense color saturation of the original RGB color! The strategy of working in B&W for contrast and tone separate from the color has powerful implications. We can create dramatic effects that go well beyond what was normally thought possible. Consider that any color image can exist in three different colorspaces and you'll realize that we actually have 10 B&W channels to use in even more complex blending operations...

10-channels

I have numerous advanced tutorials like this on my web site at: www.varis.com You can also find a 4-part video tutorial on the 10-Channel Workflow that goes through a more advanced image enhancement routine in the videos section. I'm also giving away a detailed 2-part PDF for Fans of my Facebook page here – click the "Like" button, sign up for the email list and I'll automatically send you the download links!

• • •

Lee Varis is the author of the best selling book Skin, as well as his latest book Mastering Exposure. I have both of these books, and highly recommend them!

Follow Lee on his blog.
Explore the light,
Rick

Quick Digital Imaging Tip 4/101: Attend Photo Plus Expo in New York City


This is #4 of 101 digital imaging tips I plan to post here over the next few months. Stay tuned. Only 97 more tips to go :-)


Today's Tip: Attend Photo Plus Expo in NYC, October 28 - 30, 2010. Tons of seminars, dozens of exhibitors, cool portfolio reviews, and plenty of free show-floor presentations, including mine:


Thursday

11 - Noon
Expo Imaging

1 to 1:30

LexarTravel Photography


2 to 2:30

NationsPeople Photography


3:30 to 4

Unique Photo – HDR Photography


4:15

Wiley – Book Signing


Friday

11 - Noon
Expo Imaging

1 to 1:30
Lexar – Travel Photography

2 to 2:30

Nations – People Photography


3:30 to 4

Unique Photo – HDR Photography


4:15

Wiley - Book Signing


4:30 to 5

Lexar - Travel Photography



Saturday

10-11:30

Canon - Speedlite Session


1:30 to 2

Nations – People Photography


2:30 to 3

Unique Photo – HDR Photography


3:15

Wiley – Book Signing


3:30 to 4:00

Lexar – Travel Photography


Hope to see you at the show! Start making your schedule now.


Explore the light,

Rick

Fashion Week – Day 1: Background/Setting is Key

One of the elements that adds impact to the picture in the previous post is the totally cool background. I chose it after driving around Queens, New York for three hours – checking out different backgrounds and settings for the model shoot.

The "hip" wall was perfect for the shoot, because it complemented the "hip" model. What's more, the wall was in the shade, which made controlling the light easier than had the wall been in harsh sunlight.

Positioning the model in just the right spot took some time, because I wanted the viewer's attention to go directly to the model's face.

You see my basic lighting setup in the behind-the-scenes photograph. Basic lighting is tomorrow's topic.

Explore the light,
Rick

P.S. Here are three more examples of how the background/setting complements the subject. Your assignment: Find a background that complements the subject, take a shot, and post a link in the Comments section of this post.

I guess I have a thing for graffiti!