Here Comes The Sun - And Maybe Solar Retinitis

Do you look at the sun through the camera's viewfinder? Not a good idea. Better to use your camera's LCD screen.

If you do look at the sun through your camera's viewfinder, you might get something called solar retinitis or solar retinopathy - explained by:
Michael M. Cohen, OD, FAAO
Eyecare-Media Consulting, LLC
1401 Via Loma
Walnut Creek, CA 94598-2926

The problem is that it is cumulative throughout life. A small does here and a small dose there lead to the condition.

If someone says, "I looked at the sun through my viewfinder and nothing happened," that's not true.

I've treated hundreds of people with this condition. I tell my patients that there is no real treatment other than prevention.

Photographers needs to protect their eyes, and hence their vision, throughout their life. 

For more info, check out this link:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_retinopathy

Solor Retintis may be reversible in some cases, but sometimes it's not. Your mileage may vary.

My New KelbyOne Class is the Most Comprehensive On-Line Composition Class Available

My New KelbyOne Class is the Most Comprehensive On-Line Composition Class Available

Sure, there are lots of on-line composition classes, but I promise you, none are as comprehensive as my new KelbyOne class: 20 Time-Proven Rules of Composition.

My new 1.5 hour class includes 253 slides from more than 20 worldwide/US destinations. All the major rules, as well as some of my composition philosophies, are included. Now that is comprehensive!

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Virtual Route 66 Photo Workshop - Trip Planner

Here's a cool idea for all those who ever wanted to do a Route 66 photo workshop – but who also like the freedom of traveling alone or with a buddy . . . and who don't have the budget for a live workshop. It's an on-line virtual photo workshop where I help you – before and after your road trip – make photographs like the ones in my Route 66 Gallery.

What's included:
• Our stop-by-stop itinerary from Tucumcari, New Mexico to Techatticup, Nevada – the prime cut of Route 66 . . . and more. Web sites and addresses are listed for all the Historic sites, restaurants and hotels we visited. With this itinerary I can also help you plan your road trip.
• One-hour Skype session before your trip where we discuss your trip and I review your photographs.
• I need your Skype name and a link for a gallery of your best images.
• One-hour Skype session after your trip where I review your new photographs and offer composition, exposure and processing suggestions.

This workshop will help you get the best indoors and outdoors photographs from dawn to dusk.

Cost for the two-hour virtual photo workshop is $199 payable via paypal. Shoot me an email to arrange your virtual photo workshop. One-hour sessions are available for $99.

I also give virtual photo workshops to Iceland, Yellowstone/Grand Tetons, Oregon Coast, Botswana and Kenya.

In preparation for your trip, check out my KelbyOne class: 20 Time Proven Rules of Composition.

Explore the light,
Rick

Bad Photo Workshop Behavior

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This is a post from 2015, but I decided to post it again after reading an article by Tony Sweet about bad workshop behavior in the Palouse.

I've been teaching photo workshops for about 15 years. I enjoy teaching and meeting people who share their passion for photography. What could be more fun, for the students and for me?

All my photo workshop students are courteous to each other - and to other photographers we meet on site. I stress the importance of being polite on the first day of the workshop. It's just common sense.

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My philosophy: We are all in this together.

Well my friends, on my recent photo workshop to Bosque Del Apache, New Mexico I had an experience that made my blood boil.

Here's what happened.

We arrived on site, in the dark, at 5:30 AM. Several other workshop instructors and their students were already on site. That's all well and good. First come, first serve. That happens many times in very popular shooting locations.

Why arrive so early? The photo below that I took at sunrise says it all.

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As one of my students was setting up her tripod in an open, yet tight, spot, a photographer walked in front of our student and said, rather curtly, "That's my spot."

My student responded, "It's an open spot No one is here."

The very rude student from the other workshop said, "I was here first, I'm setting up my second tripod." (It was a tripod with a second camera and a $3,000+ lens.)

I was shocked. I said to my student, "Hang in."

I walked around for about two minutes and found a clear spot for my student. She got wonderful images - as did all of our workshop students.

As usual, after all our students were set up with "first class" spots, I set up my tripod in "coach," behind the students, and in some cases next to the students where there was room.

On a side note, I often take pictures on site and show the students the shot to illustrate a composition or lighting technique. After all, one reason photographers come on my workshops is to see how I shoot.

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The rude student could have said: "Let's try to squeeze in here together.  Let's get cozy. Let's try to make it work. We are all in this together." 

Here's another idea: "Her spot" was not her spot. If you leave a spot and come back in 10 minutes or 10 hours, it's no longer your spot. Right?

Post a comment if you like. I'd love to hear from you, especially if you have a "bad workshop behavior" story.

Of course, if you have a good behavior story, please share that, too!

Oh yeah, there was also a guy smoking a smelly cigar in the group. Not cool, especially at 5 AM.

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Explore the light,
Rick