Photo Tours

How Come I'm Not Getting The Shots?

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I teach a lot of workshops throughout the year.

Every so often a workshop participant asks: "How come I'm not getting the shots that the other photographers are getting?"

I've seen this happen on all different types of workshops - wildlife, people, landscape and so on. I've heard this from my fellow workshops instructors, too.

The answer, sometimes, is equipment. In some situations, a certain lens, say a 400mm or a 15mm, is indeed needed.

In other situations, it's luck.

Of course, sometimes the photographer is a novice and has not yet acquired the skills to get specific shots.

Sometimes, and this is the point of this post, it's the photographer's responsibility.

To help all workshop participants, here's my list of "A Workshop Participant's Responsibilities."

Know your camera - especially when it comes to fine-tuning the exposure with the +/- exposure compensation control - or dialing in the correct exposure manually. After all, for every photographer, there is only one correct exposure. (For more on exposure, check out my class on Kelby Training: Light - the main element in every photograph.)

Stick like glue to the instructor.

Ask to see the instructor's photographs, and the photographs of the other workshop participants.

Know that the instructor is not a "mind reader" when it comes to your needs.

Show the instructor, and the other participants, your pictures as often as possible on your camera's LCD panel.

Be part of the "team" - and join in the fun, as well as the work.

Ask questions.

Do your homework before leaving home on the location, subject and the equipment that's needed.

Sit with the instructor during Photoshop and Lightroom sessions and see how your shots can be improved.

Set goals, and maybe even a specific goal.

So my friends, speak up, join in, ask questions, know your camera, do your homework, don't assume anything, set goals, stick like glue . . . and you'll get the most out of a photo workshop. The more you put in, the more you'll get out.

If you like the stuff you see here on my blog, you can subscribe here.

Explore the light,
Rick

Day 2: 6 Days of Canon EOS 6D Images from Route 66

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It's Day 2 in my blog series: 6 Days of Canon EOS 6D Images from Route 66. Each day I will post a few of my favorite images along with some photography tips – from the "Mother Road." Hope you enjoy the "ride."

A general tip before we get going: Use plug-ins and image-editing software to remove some of the reality from a  scene, as well as to create a mood. I used Nik's Snapseed to add a retro look to all these images. All my plug-ins are listed on my Save-on Plug-ins page.

Location: Tucumcari, New Mexico.

Opening image: Tucumcari Trading Post. Canon 17-40mm lens. HDR was needed because I was shooting into the sun, which is hidden behind the clouds. I created the image from seven bracketed exposures.

Tip: Use your camera like a spaceship. My camera, mounted on my Really Right Stuff tripod, my camera was positioned about a foot above my head for this shot. I used Live View on the Canon 6D to compose the shot.

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Above: Tucumcari Trading Post. Canon 17-40mm lens.

Tip: Tell the whole story. Take close-up shots in addition to photographing the wide view.

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Above: Best Mexican Food in Tucumcari? Maybe at one time. Canon 17-40mm lens.

Tip: Expose for the highlights and compose carefully. Watch the background, too. Learn about light and composition in my Kelby Training classes.

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Above: Fast wireless and $23 bucks night. Color TV, too! What could be better? Canon 17-40mm lens.

Tip: The name of the game is to fill the frame. Hey, that composition rule worked for this image. But remember, negative space can be good, too.

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Above: "You can trust your car . . . . " If you don't know that slogan, you are much younger than I am. Canon 17-40mm lens.

Tip: As you can see, I used one lens for all of the images in this post – even though I have several other lenses in my camera bag. The tip here: Keep it simple and have easy and fast access to your gear when you are on the move.

If you are interested in buying a Canon 6D, check out Adorama. If you want to rent one, perhaps for a road trip, check out BorrowLenses.com.

All the gear I've packed for this trip is listed here.

Okay, it's time to get back on the road.

Explore the light,
Rick

P.S. Want to join my 2014 Route 66 Photo Caravan/Workshop? Shoot me an email for info. All my workshops are listed on the Workshop pages on the left.

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5 Ways to Become a Better Photographer

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If you want to become a better photographer, I have five different options for you. Some are available in the comfort of your own home, others are available on location.

On-line: Check out my Kelby Training courses on Light and Composition - the two key ingredients that go into the making of a good photograph. The combo of both courses will help you see the light and compose carefully.

On your iPad or iPhone: I have 10 apps that cover dozens of different photographic techniques for indoor and outdoor shooting, in your home, on location and in a studio.

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My photo workshops: If you like hands-on training – in photography, Lightroom and Photoshop – these workshops are for you. You'll get great photos, have a ton of fun and make new friends.

My seminars: Most of my seminars are free of charge or cost just a few bucks. Bring your questions. I am there to help.

Tough Love: One-on-one, on-line portfolio reviews.
I'll be upfront and honest with you.

I hope to meet up with you somewhere – on line or in person.

Explore the light,
Rick

This post is sponsored by BlackRapid - the fastest way to shoot.

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