Travel Photography How-to Week. Day 1: Be On the Lookout

When we travel, we always need to have the “radar” up – looking, rather than just seeing. It’s kinda like the difference between haring music and listening to music. Big difference.

While walking around the streets of Trinidad, I noticed this wonderful wall, which made a nice photo itself. Shortly after photographing the wall, I moved on. Then, about two minutes later, I noticed a horse-drawn cart coming down the street at a moderate speed. Because my radar was up, I saw a potential picture in my mind’s eye. The picture was the cart in front of the wonderful wall. I ran back to the wall at top speed and snapped the picture you see here – with my Canon G10 point-and-shoot camera, by the way.

The top images are Topaz Adjust images (click here for info). The bottom images are the straight shots.

So, keep up your “radar” at all times.

I hope you enjoy this week’s photos and the tips. If you want some hands-on experience, hope you can join one of my workshops.

If you are interested in joining one of my Cuba Workshops (after it opens and Americans can go legally (you need a license from the U.S Treasury Department now), keep checking my Events page.

Explore the light,
Rick
P.S. I know posting these four images together makes this post look very busy. Sorry, it was the easiest way to get my tips across. For a larger view, just click on the image.

Why I Think We Like Sunrises

Thanks to all for posting (on my twitter site) their reasons as to why humans like sunrises.

Here is my guess:

Most action in the animal kingdom, above and under water, takes place at sunrise and sunset. Animals seek out prey and seek out protecting from predators during those times. In Africa for example, most of the action is over by 8 AM; it does not start until around sunset. It's the same on the coral reef. This has been true for millions of years. Perhaps the reason we like sunrises and sunsets is because millions of years ago, it was at those times when we were most alert to danger and exhilarated by a potential meal – and perhaps somewhere buried in our minds are those feelings.

• • •

And here is what Dr. Richard Zakia, author of Perception of Imaging, says about sunrises:

I think you hit the nail on the head with your insight. We are part of the animal world. I think if we did not live in our civilized world we might be more attentive to sunrise and sunset, like our farmers are. I wonder if animals were 'civilized', like those that live in a zoo or aquarium, respond the same way to sunset and sunrise as those in the wild.

I recall an experiment that was done some years back where a woman was put in a
dark space for a couple of days to determine whether she could tell sunrise from sunset,
sleep time from wake time, or something like that. The result was astonishing. She could.

Happiness,
Dick

Travel Photography How-to Week. Prelude: Always Carry a Camera

I could not wait to start my Travel Photography How-to Week, so I am starting one day early with this prelude.

This week I’ll focus on taking people pictures. Next week: shooting in a city will be the topic. (If you have a topic you’d like me to cover, let me know!)

Some of the pictures I’ll use were taken on my 2001 trip to Cuba – one of my favorite destinations. You may have seen some of these pictures in my books. Others were taken on my more recent travels.

Why use so many Cuba photographs? Because I think/hope that Cuba will be open to American soon! And I think that as a photographer, you’ll love it there.

Today’s tip: Always carry a camera – no matter how tired you feel or how much you just want to kick back and relax. I know that sounds simple, but my guess is that not everyone reading this blog follows that advice.

I took this shot of little boy in a small pizza shop. He ducked in to get out of the rain. I love the innocence and the eye contact in the image. I photographed this woman smoking a cigar on my way to lunch.

Both photographs were unexpected keepers that I took in common locations.

When I want to relax and not walk around with my two Canon 5D Mark II cameras, I tote my Canon G10. It’s great for fun shots and even serious shots … as long as I don’t shoot above ISO 400 in low light situations (where digital noise starts to creep in).

I hope you enjoy this week’s photos and the tips. If you want some hands-on experience, hope you can join one of my workshops.

If you are interested in joining one of my Cuba Workshops (after it opens and Americans can go legally (you need a license from the U.S Treasury Department now), keep checking my Events page.

Explore the light,
Rick

Favorite Photo?

While teaching a workshop last week for the Light Photographic Workshops, I snapped off these three shots.

Only one is a keeper for me.

Which one do you like? And, more important, why?

I'd be interested in your opinion.

See the light,
Rick