Glenn Taylor Hits "The Mother Road" - Route 66

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Next week I start a new project: 6 Days of Canon 6D Shots from Route 66. Stay tuned for posts here on my blog. For this project, I am borrowing two Canon 6D cameras from BorrowLenses.com.

The project was inspired by my friend Glenn Taylor's images from a trip he took last year. Thank you Glenn for the inspiration.

Here are a few of my favorite Glenn Taylor images from his trip - along with a little write-up.

In February 2012 I went on a photographic journey along Route 66 from Albuquerque to Las Vegas along with Rob Knight and several other of my Atlanta-based photo friends. Rob and Keith Mendel got the basic plan together, we set dates that worked with everyone's schedules and flew out to meet up in Albuquerque.

We spent the first night at the Monterey Motel, a classic Route 66 style roadside motel and they suggested we have breakfast in Old Town, a few blocks away. The breakfast was delicious and we explored the area afterward on foot. Most of it was little shops and restaurants, but we really enjoyed shooting the San felipe de Neri Church right off the square. It was beautiful with the morning light streaming over it and the interior had some interesting statues and textures.

We then hit the road headed toward Holbrook, AZ. Along the way we stopped whenever we saw something interesting. Old bridges from the heyday of the highway’s glory to both handmade and official Route 66 symbols. Later in the day we came across the remains of the Bluewater Motel.

The grunge and classic design of this Bluewater Motel sign really caught my eye. I also loved the complimentary blue and bright yellow colors along with the rust and geometric shapes. You can just imagine how great this sign looked when it was first installed and turned on.

The grunge and classic design of this Bluewater Motel sign really caught my eye. I also loved the complimentary blue and bright yellow colors along with the rust and geometric shapes. You can just imagine how great this sign looked when it was first installed and turned on.

Fast forward . . . The sun was starting to set as we pulled out of the park and we were close to Holbrook and the Wigwam Motel. We made the choice to push on and try to get there before the light was gone and get some photos. We got there just in time to capture some beautiful warm light on these classic cars and unusal little wigwam rooms. We made the decision to come out before dawn the next morning and get some HDR images of this unique location.

The Wigwam Motel office and classic cars at dawn. I shot this as a 5 exposure HDR with my Canon 24-70mm at a medium length. I processed this in Photomatix Pro, finishing it in Lightroom, NIK Color Efex and Photoshop.

The Wigwam Motel office and classic cars at dawn. I shot this as a 5 exposure HDR with my Canon 24-70mm at a medium length. I processed this in Photomatix Pro, finishing it in Lightroom, NIK Color Efex and Photoshop.

Fast forward . . . We stopped in Winslow, AZ. You may recognize it from the famous Eagles' song. The corner is there in Winslow at the main intersection in town. It’s a sight not to be missed.We pushed on toward Flagstaff for lunch making a few stops along the way for abandoned buildings and old roadsigns until we came to Two Guns. There is a lot of history here dating back to the native Americans and on through to Route 66 when it was a tourist stop with a zoo containing mountain lions. Nothing is left now but the old stone structures but they make for some great images.

Left: Standing on the corner in Winslow Arizona. The classic Route 66 emblem in the intersection gives this a lot of interest. I shot this with my 24-70mm and finished it in Lightroom. Right: Stone structures at Two Guns. The textures here make some very textured BW images. I processed these in NIK Siver Efex.

Left: Standing on the corner in Winslow Arizona. The classic Route 66 emblem in the intersection gives this a lot of interest. I shot this with my 24-70mm and finished it in Lightroom. Right: Stone structures at Two Guns. The textures here make some very textured BW images. I processed these in NIK Siver Efex.

Fast forward . . . We stopped in Williams, AZ to Seligman, AZ.  There we met and spent some time with Angel Delgadillio. His barber shop and his late brother’s roadside stand are not to be missed. They were both instrumental in keeping Route 66 and its history alive, especially in Arizona. You could not meet a nicer person than Angel. If you go make sure you buy a shirt or hat and have him sign it for you. It was the only souvenir I purchased on the entire trip.

Left: Angel’s barbershop is covered in history and business cards from all over the planet from people wjo have visited him and his beloved Seligman, AZ. I shot this with my Canon 35mm prime lens using the natural light from the window. Processed in Lightroom. And you may notice, that’s Angel as a young man straight out of barber school, in the photo on the right hand side of the counter. Right: I took this portrait of Angel with my Canon 70-300mm using the natural light from the window to his left. He posed for as long as we wanted to shoot and then signed autographs for all of us.. He’s an American original and made the trip something sopecial for all of us.

Left: Angel’s barbershop is covered in history and business cards from all over the planet from people wjo have visited him and his beloved Seligman, AZ. I shot this with my Canon 35mm prime lens using the natural light from the window. Processed in Lightroom. And you may notice, that’s Angel as a young man straight out of barber school, in the photo on the right hand side of the counter. Right: I took this portrait of Angel with my Canon 70-300mm using the natural light from the window to his left. He posed for as long as we wanted to shoot and then signed autographs for all of us.. He’s an American original and made the trip something sopecial for all of us.

Our next stop was Hackberry, AZ for sunset. Hackberry has a little roadside store and grounds containing a wealth of old cars, gas pumps, signs and general Route 66 goodness. We shot details shots while we waited for the sun to drop, shot the sunset until dark and then headed to nearby Kingman, AZ for the night.

Left: Detail of weathered oil can on an outside rack. I took this with my 35mm prime at f2.8 for a shallow depth of field and finished it in Lightroom with a slight vignette. Right: I like the composition of this old Chevrolet looking across the highway to the mountains and the setting sun. I shot this as a 7 exposure HDR with my Canon 17-40mm at a wide view. I processed this in Photomatix Pro, finishing it in Lightroom and NIK Color Efex.

Left: Detail of weathered oil can on an outside rack. I took this with my 35mm prime at f2.8 for a shallow depth of field and finished it in Lightroom with a slight vignette. Right: I like the composition of this old Chevrolet looking across the highway to the mountains and the setting sun. I shot this as a 7 exposure HDR with my Canon 17-40mm at a wide view. I processed this in Photomatix Pro, finishing it in Lightroom and NIK Color Efex.

Detail shots from around the town of Oatman. The bar in the historic hotel has many, many bills covering every wall and ceiling area. The shovel and barbed wire wreath hang on what was once an old pharmacy among other things and was a location for a scene used in the movie “How the West was Won."

Detail shots from around the town of Oatman. The bar in the historic hotel has many, many bills covering every wall and ceiling area. The shovel and barbed wire wreath hang on what was once an old pharmacy among other things and was a location for a scene used in the movie “How the West was Won."

Fast forward . . .  We arrived in  Las Vegas to shoot sunset and have an end-of-the-trip dinner at a hip steak place that Rob likes to frequent. A great meal with good friends topped off the end of our journey. It was a quick four days, but we packed in a lot of shooting and some long-lasting memories of the Mother Road.

Sunset on the Las Vegas strip from the observation deck of the Stratosphere. The magnificent view and a beautiful sky were only hampered by the no-tripod policy. I handheld this with my Canon 85mm prime, opened up and at 800 ISO. I used the continuous mode on the shutter, and steadied myself to try and make sure I got at least one image in the sequence with little to no motion blur.

Sunset on the Las Vegas strip from the observation deck of the Stratosphere. The magnificent view and a beautiful sky were only hampered by the no-tripod policy. I handheld this with my Canon 85mm prime, opened up and at 800 ISO. I used the continuous mode on the shutter, and steadied myself to try and make sure I got at least one image in the sequence with little to no motion blur.

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Thank you Glenn for a super post!

Glenn and I will be leading the Atlanta Digital Photo Experience Event next year. Hope you can join the photo fun. Info on my 2014 Workshops page.

Explore the light,
Rick

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