photo workshops

Virtual Venice Carnavale Photo Workshop

Virtual Venice Carnavale Photo Workshop

Here's a cool idea for all those who ever wanted to do a Venice Carnavale photo workshop – but who also like the freedom of traveling alone or with a buddy . . . and who don't have the budget for a live workshop. It's an on-line virtual photo workshop where I help you – before and after your road trip – make photographs like the ones in my Carnavale 2018 Gallery.

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Virtual Travel Photography Workshop - to your destination

Here's a cool idea for all those who ever wanted to do a photo workshop – but who also like the freedom of traveling alone or with a buddy . . . and who don't have the budget for a live workshop, which can be very expensive. It's an on-line virtual photo workshop where I help you via Skype – before and after your trip – make photographs rather than just take photographs.

I've been to about 100 countries and all the US National Parks, so chances are I have been to the location you will be visiting.

Here is how it works:
• We have a one-hour Skype session before your trip where we discuss your trip and I review your travel photographs.
• I need your Skype name and a link for a gallery of your best images.
• One-hour Skype session after your trip where I review your new photographs and offer composition, exposure and processing suggestions.

Cost for the virtual photo workshop is $199 payable via paypal. Shoot me an email to arrange your virtual photo workshop.

Explore the light,
Rick

Evolution Of An On-Location Portrait Session

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My 37th book – Evolution of an Image – will be available on amazon on October 5th. For each end-result image I take the reader through the entire photographic process, from start to finish – including my Lightroom enhancements.

This example (updated from a previous post) is not in the book. I share it in the post as a bonus. Enjoy!

While going through the images from one of my Spearfish, South Dakota workshops, I came up with the idea to share with you a few images that illustrate the "evolution of an on-location portrait session." Here goes.

Above: HDR image, which is a hand-held, in-camera Canon 5D Mark III HDR image. I had to shoot HDR due to the high contrast range. My lens: Canon 24-105mm IS, which is my favorite lens.

Here's why I like the image: nice light rays, low camera angle, cowboy looking toward the light, night light on his face, relaxed pose, relatively plain background.

I shot at ISO 4000 - yes 4000 – due to the low light. Even at that high ISO setting, I saw little noise in the images.

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Above: Adobe Bridge screen shot of the three raw files and the in-camera produced HDR JPEG image.

The final setting (in opening image) in the old barn was not my first choice for posing the cowboy.

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Above: This location was my first pick for our portrait session. I liked the light, but it turned out that the scene was just too cluttered, plus the light was not working for me.

For more on light and composition, see my KelbyOne classes.

By the way, the scene looks soft because there was a ton of dust in the old barn.

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Above: A behind-the-scenes shot showing the students shooting. On my workshops, everyone has the opportunity to make great pictures.

The message of this post: When you are on location, keep looking - and testing - for the best light and best background, as well as the best pose.

Also think about the digital technology (in-camera HDR in this case) can help you make the picture you see in your mind's eye.

In my new book, I go into much, much greater detail for each image.

Explore the light
Rick

It's "Hey Rick, What's your f-stop?" Friday #2

"Hey Rick! What's your f-stop?" That's the question I get asked most on my photo workshops. I reply, with a smile, "My friend. What is your creative vision, what is your goal?" Those are the important question - for photographers to ask themselves.

In this blog series I will share with you my goal and camera settings for some of my favorite recent photographs, which will be featured in my next (#37) book, Evolution of an Image (September 2016 publication).

Here goes.

Goal: Make a photograph that illustrates a bygone time in the Palouse.

Thought process: Use HDR (High Dynamic Range) imaging to capture the contrast range of the scene – the bright areas outside the truck and the dark areas inside the truck.

Tech Info:
Camera: Canon 5D Mark III
Lens: Canon 14mm lens
Camera settings:
• In-camera HDR set-up (but processed the thee images in Lightroom for more creative control);
• Manual focus – to ensure the same focus throughout the bracketed sequence;
• ISO 1600 – set for a sharp hand-held sequence in the relatively low light situation, 1/500th second (middle exposure in bracketing sequence) – for a steady hand-held shot even at the slowest shutter speed (1/125th second) in the bracketed sequence, f/11 – for good depth-of-field.

I hope you can participate in one of my photo workshops, where no question is too basic or too simple.
2016 Workshops
2017 Workshops
2018 Workshops

For more tips, tricks and techniques, see my current best-selling book, Creative Visualization for Photographers. Also check out my KelbyOne on-line classes.

Explore the light,
Rick